#386: Deirdre Tobias, ScD – Study Design, Diet Collection Methods and Nutrition Epidemiology

In Podcasts by Danny Lennon1 Comment

Guest Information

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Deirdre Tobias, ScD

Dr. Tobias is a nutrition and obesity epidemiologist at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. She received doctoral and postdoctoral training from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, under mentor Dr. Frank B. Hu.

Dr. Tobias is co-Instructor of Nutrition Epidemiology with Dr. Walter Willett and faculty member at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. Her epidemiologic research focuses on identifying lifestyle risk factors and underlying mechanisms related to obesity and its major chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cancer.

Dr. Tobias is currently the Academic Editor for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In this episode we discuss:

  • Trial designs and their application
  • Importance of an appropriate contrast exposure
  • Diet collection methods: use and misuse
  • Benefit of repeated measures of diet
  • How to better understand epidemiology

Links & Resources

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Comments

  1. Amazing, thanks for this content. Regarding the question about wich ser of data would you trust about past-year meat consumption, I guess that subjects in the intention to treat arm could be more motivated to answer low consumption, so correct answer bias may be a source of bias on this particular group.
    Also, i found very valuable that Dr . Tobias spoke regarding non acounted food alternatives when studies consider a particular food as exposure, for this matter I think dietary pattern analysis gives a complementary picture that consider all of this information toghether as well as a more easy to translate to public recomendations (wich is one of epi ends)

    Incredible, thanks for this content. Regarding the question about which data series you would trust about last year’s meat consumption, I suppose that subjects in the intention-to-treat arm might be more motivated to answer low consumption, so correct answer bias may be a source of erro on this particular group.
    In addition, I found it very valuable that Dr. Tobias spoke about the uncounted food alternatives when studies consider a particular food as exposure, in this sense I believe that analysis of dietary patterns provides a complementary picture that considers all this information together and is easier to translate to public recommendations (which is one of epi ends)

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