SNR #165: Kevin Hall, PhD – Testing the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model & a Response to Gary Taubes

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SNR #165

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadShare this episode on Facebook Episode 165: Kevin Hall, PhD of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is on the podcast to discuss his work examining the carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity and responds to recent comments on the issue by Gary Taubes. Get the podcast on iTunes (iOS) Get the podcast on Stitcher (Android app) Get podcast RSS feed Click Here to Get Podcast Transcripts Guest Bio Kevin Hall, Ph.D. Dr. Hall is a Senior Investigator in the Laboratory of Biological Modeling at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). … Read More

SNR #152: Lyle McDonald – Glycaemic Load, Trigger Foods & Physiology vs. Practical Implementation

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snr-152

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadShare this episode on Facebook Episode 152: Lyle McDonald is back on the show to discuss glycaemic load, trigger foods, behavioural eating, hyperpalatability and the difference between giving practical recommendations and what is correct from a physiological perspective. Get the podcast on iTunes (iOS) Get the podcast on Stitcher (Android app) Get podcast RSS feed Click Here to Get Podcast Transcripts  Lyle McDonald Lyle McDonald is the author of the Ketogenic Diet, the Rapid Fat Loss Handbook and the Guide to Flexible Dieting. He has been interested in all aspects of human performance physiology since … Read More

Calorie Deficits #1: Understanding the Nuances of Energy Balance

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Recently I received the following question from podcast listener Noah: “what is the best way to lose massive amounts of fat as fast as possible, without compromising gainz?” It should be inherently obvious to anyone familiar with the relationship between energy balance and body weight that to lose the absolute most amount of fat mass over a given time frame would mean creating the absolute largest energy deficit possible. But equally as obvious, is that creating the largest energy deficit possible (i.e. starvation + high activity) is neither practical nor is it desirable if we plan on holding onto muscle … Read More

Food Quality, IIFYM and Strawmen: Do Food Choices Even Matter?

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SNR #67

It’s Friday night and you’re just settling into relaxation mode for the weekend after a tough week at work. You rock into the kitchen to rustle up something to eat. You’ve narrowed it down to two meals you enjoy. Now it’s decision time… Sweet potato and coconut oil or ice cream? What’s the best choice? (The fact you’re reading this blog I’m going to assume you care about health and body composition) Does this seem like a ridiculous question? Do you think there’s one obvious choice? Or do you feel it doesn’t matter? I don’t think we can answer the … Read More

How Do You Avoid Overeating (Without Counting Calories)?

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So if we inherently know that “over-eating is what causes fat gain” then the solution should be pretty straight forward: “Stop eating so much and you’ll lose fat”. Which is 100% true. If you eat at a caloric intake that puts you into a calorie deficit (i.e. the energy you consume is less than that you expend) then you’re bodyweight will drop. But the problem with that statement (apart from it being as blunt as a hammer) is that it gives nothing in the way of actionable advice. It never gets at the underlying cause. It never gets us to stop and … Read More

The Most Misleading Nutrition Statements in the History of Ever

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Let’s take a look at some common statements you’ve no doubt come across, that are perhaps a bit misleading… “Calories don’t matter, as long as you’re eating real food!” Sure, including more real food and less highly-refined foods in someone’s diet is a great way to both support health and fat loss (if that’s the goal). And we know plenty of people have made this change and transformed their physique. But let’s be clear why… More real/whole foods will generally (there are exceptions) mean higher satiety, more fibre, more protein, better blood sugar regulation and so an overall lower drive to overconsume. … Read More

Eat More Fat, Burn More Fat: Myth, Magic or Metabolic Advantage?

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. However, telling people that they should “eat more fat to burn more fat” may be misleading. Not because you won’t “burn more fat” on a high-fat diet but because the practical implications of this are different to what most people will think of when they hear that statement. You see, ‘fat-burning’ as a term can be quite deceptive unless we define what context we mean it in. For most people just seeking general fat loss advice, the term fat-burning will simply mean that they’re losing body fat. However, to someone with a deeper understanding of human metabolism it will be seen as a … Read More

The Pros & Cons of Counting Calories

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Tech is changing the way we do everything. For nutrition, one of the most basic tech interventions is still one of the most valuable: something to track/log food intake. This is super helpful from a coaching point of view too. I’ll often start people with tracking intake so I can get an idea where they are starting at. My app of choice thus far has been My Fitness Pal, as it’s free and very easy to use. Although there are a number of great options available. MyFitnessPal allows me to track food intake and gives a breakdown of calories’ and … Read More

The High-Fat Diet Trap: How Much is Too Much?

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high fat diet trap

We all used to think fat was evil. Something ingrained in us by the bombardment by the promotion of low-fat dietary guidelines, low-fat branded products and “fat is bad” marketing campaigns. We fell into a low-fat diet trap. But thankfully the tide has started to turn. I think it’s become clear that dietary fat is not “bad”. Neither is saturated fat. The after-effects of the scaremongering around fat intake means that many people need to actually increase their fat consumption. And science-driven coaches, nutritionists and researchers are warning people not to buy into the “anti-fat” dogma. Many people now realise fat isn’t … Read More

Carb Dogma is for Hipsters

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hipster post

In what seems to be an increasingly common occurrence, I am seeing popular nutrition trends emerging, following something I can only describe as the “hipster pattern”. You know, the “get-on-it-now-because-its-the-opposite-to-everyone-else” thing. And once everyone else starts doing it, it’s no longer cool. One perfect example right now is carbohydrate intake. We were being erroneously told that eating most of our calories from carbohydrates was a good idea. Only to realise that this in fact is probably not all that helpful for a large number of people. With this, the low-carb scene exploded when the word got out. And at first … Read More

Making the Cut, Part II: How fighters should eat for fat loss (without destroying training performance and health)

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This is part II of a 4-part series. You can catch part I here. Can a fighter get lean without absolutely tanking performance in the gym or making themselves feel dreadful throughout the leaning out process. Without doubt, YES! But to do so there are things that need to be considered. Cutting Weight vs. Losing Weight One thing to clear up for those of you who aren’t involved in combat sports and perhaps not familiar with cutting weight is the difference between cutting weight and losing body fat. It should seem logical that having a fighter as strong as possible … Read More

Does Insulin Make You Fat?

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Revision: What Happens When We Eat Carbs When we eat carbohydrates of any kind, we break them down into glucose molecules. This glucose is transported around the body in the bloodstream to the various bodily tissues to be used as energy. This circulating glucose is what is commonly called blood sugar. Our body generally wants to keep our blood sugar (blood glucose) stable and so tries to keep blood glucose levels within quite a narrow range (on average this is about 5.5 mmol/L but can vary among individuals). When our bodies detect a rise in blood glucose, it responds by … Read More